We Want YOU for the Draft!

Molly Clemens, Editor

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Uncle Sam’s request is no longer just that–a request. Though the United States army moved to a purely volunteer basis by 1973, the Selective Service Act still remains in place as a contingency plan. When signing up for a driver’s license, ID, or registering to vote, all male citizens passively register for conscription, so a draft can be resumed in the case of war. Nearly half of our school’s population could be drafted if WWIII occurs after they graduate. 

Since the Conscription Act of 1863, which drafted Union men to fight in the war, people have found ways around fighting. Back then, by simply paying $300 or finding a replacement, men could avoid the war. Now, the process of the rich evading duty continues, though often underground. By paying off doctors to fake a diagnosis of an illness or disability that would hinder their duty, wealthy parents often get their children off the hook.

Today, just like in 1863, the poor often find themselves fighting most of America’s wars in place of the wealthy. By tightening standards to reduce the number of fake doctors’ notes and genuinely requiring a draft for America’s upper class, we could lessen US involvement in wars. When the richer, more influential people in America, be it CEOs, politicians, or lobbyists, find their own children, rather than impoverished strangers, fighting our wars, they are much less likely to support them.

Junior Evan Purutcuoglu said, “Seeing my peers get drafted would definitely make me second-guess any wars I once completely supported. It puts such a personal stake in what was once a cold, inhuman subject.”

Shelby Morgan, another junior, said, “If our guy friends could be drafted out of high school, girls should be, too. We can’t fight for equality but only pick and choose what negative side effects we want.”

Putting female citizens ages 18-25 in the Selective Service pool would also reduce our involvement in wars, since many parents are even less likely to want their daughters overseas. 

Yes, the draft is scary. But when used properly, it could prevent America from fighting in endless wars, like the war in Afghanistan. Because when 18-year-olds are fighting in a war older than they are, we need to take action. So let’s listen to Uncle Sam. We want everyone, women and wealthy included, for the US Army.

 

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